Boom! Shazaam! ‘Where’d he go?’, the resurrection according to Matthew and Spielberg, with visuals by God.

What a weekend! What a week! What a day! What a sunrise!

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Looking back its really easy to look past the middle of the road stuff and see either the highs or the lows… most of the time when someone asks how you’re doing the reply is either ‘Great, thanks!’ ‘Busy as you like!’, on occasions we may be ‘just awful’, but its rare that we describe ourselves and our day as ‘a bit pants and a bit good, you know’…

I’m saying this because when we read the events of the first Easter, they’re viewed in hindsight- the women were overjoyed, the men ran to the tomb, the angel- well, the angel played it pretty cool actually. After an event we talk it down or we talk it up, but while its happening we’re mostly just getting through- hanging on with our fingertips, refusing to give up, or just trudging along. Last week I took my daughters on their first rollercoaster ride… there was much screaming, laughter and general ‘whoa!’-ing, but when the ride finished, their voices were unleashed ‘it was like this, and so that and then…’ Often in church we’re quite good at calm and reflective, but we don’t tend to do too much ‘it was just amazing!!’… maybe we should try a bit more?

Anyway, some of these things and more were included in my talk on Sunday morning which was based on Matthew’s Gospel… it was recorded on the website here, and my original notes looked a little like this:

Matthew’s account of the resurrection is a real action movie- there’re angels and supernatural earthquakes, but there’s also the human aspect- down to earth things- the body is gone… Jesus appears and speaks to the women- they can ‘clasp his feet’…

At the beginning of the day, everyone thought they knew what was going to happen- the guards, the women and the disciples… but they were all wrong. And so their first reaction is a mix of disbelief and fear- Guards were afraid, Angel says do not be afraid, women hurry away, afraid… Jesus says don’t be afraid…

But the women were also filled with joy…

When something momentous happens, how do you feel? When you get wonderful news, what emotions go through you? A friend gave me some news the other day- it was big stuff, and I could feel a whole mix of thoughts- concern, sorrow, relief… when you get the best news, sometimes its hard to accept it… sometimes you have to say to yourself ‘is this real’- but the answer is often ‘why wouldn’t it be?’… when someone tells me its raining, I rarely look up… when they see a rainbow I’ll come to the window- if they say its snowing I can’t bring myself to believe it until I know for myself.

The resurrection- Matthew and the other Gospel writers, who are the primary source for Jesus’ life, seem to present the resurrection and the post-resurrection appearances of Jesus to his disciples in the same way as they present the rest of their gospels- when they include a story, its clear that they aren’t presenting that as something that happened…

If Jesus rose again, its of supreme importance- because it validates what he said about who he was, about his power and authority, and it means so much for life after death.

If Jesus did not rise again, its of supreme importance- because it invalidates his claims, and the claims of others around him, it means that he was ‘just a teacher’, but one with a remarkable idea that he was the Son of God- or whose teachings were so warped as to sound like that… either way Jesus is not someone to follow.

What are the alternatives?

He didn’t really die- Soldiers put him on the cross, a soldier stabbed him with a spear… they were professionals doing their job…

The women and disciples were mistaken- (wrong tomb) if so, why didn’t the authorities at the time produce Jesus’ body? That would have quashed the stories early on, and there wouldn’t have ever been a church

The disciples stole the body- that was the line the authorities took… interestingly in Acts it never comes up again… when Peter, John, Stephen and Paul are before the Jewish or Roman authorities, on trial about their claims, its not recorded that anyone suggests this… instead the response is ‘blasphemy’- how can you suggest Jesus was the messiah? Rather than ‘of course he wasn’t, you’re deluded and wrong’…

A spiritual resurrection- this suggestion comes from Christians who want to believe the accounts of a resurrection but can’t accept the idea of a bodily resurrection… but it has two big problems- where did the body go? And what does ‘spiritual resurrection’ mean- his disciples claimed they saw and touched him, and shared food with him… and the body was gone… a spiritual resurrection doesn’t actually help, it just raises other, equally big questions.

The resurrection started a chain of events that has led to us being here today…

There was a man named Jesus who was crucified outside Jerusalem- the Bible says so, the Jewish historian Josephus says so.

His followers claimed that he rose from the dead- again, the Bible, Josephus, Tacitus, Suetonius and the Jewish Talmud all agree that his followers claimed this…

Those followers then went on to live as if what they claimed was true- to travel around sharing the news with others, they didn’t deny it under oath or torture. They lived lives in keeping with Jesus teaching, including practices of generosity as well as healing the sick… they prayed and bore witness to lives changed through prayer and God’s power.

If that had all been untrue, or just made up, it would never have made it out of Jerusalem, out of Palestine… it would never have made it to the heart of the Roman Empire, where for the next 200yrs Christians were persecuted- but still continuing to grow in numbers until its estimated that by the time of the Edict of Milan in 313AD there were over 200million Christians…

Despite rumours to the contrary the Christian faith is still alive and well in the world… but it is true that there are a lot of people in our own country and community that wouldn’t accept the claims that Christianity makes… so the challenge for us is to let them see the truth of those claims in our lives- in our love for the poor as well as the rich, in our generosity to the stranger as well as to our friends, in our faithfulness in the small things and the large- in the way that we show the love of Christ that prompted him to live on this earth, to minister amongst Jews, Samaritans and Gentiles, and to walk the path of the cross.

We worship Jesus as the son of God, because that is who we believe he is, as demonstrated supremely by his death and resurrection- which is why you’ll see here and in many other churches an empty cross- a symbol of state execution, but without its victim. We remember his sacrifice in the way he showed his disciples- through the breaking of bread and the sharing of wine- in some churches using grape juice, wafers, raisins or other things- in some countries using different food that has meaning to them, with the use of water to demonstrate that even the poorest of us can bring something. We celebrate that Jesus is the light of the world, who came into the darkness- with candles, white to symbolise purity… we do all this, and remind ourselves with the words of our communion prayer, that we worship, follow and serve a God of love and power who knows us and sees us at our worst, yet would transform each of us to more than we could hope for. Let us worship the Lord- Alleluia, Christ is risen.

 

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